Pedro Luís Cunha Farias

Pedro Farias is a sophomore at Harvard College concentrating in Computer Science with a secondary in Government. He was born and spent most of his life living in Brasilia, Brazil. Pedro is awed and inspired by the potential for technology to bridge global gaps and mitigate pressing issues. He is particularly interested in exploring how machine learning and artificial intelligence can be employed to enhance the educational experience of students in Brazil and beyond. Outside of class, you’ll likely find Pedro reading about international relations, politics, and financial markets. He’s heavily involved in the Harvard Undergraduate Brazilian Association and, of course, Model UN. Pedro absolutely loves MUN, especially conferences in Latin America because of the incredible delegates and cultures of the region. At HNMUN-LA 2018, he will look forward to being able to speak more Portuguese and to continue to pretend to speak Spanish (he only knows Portuñol).

Topic a: combatting political corruption

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime operates throughout the world since its inception in 1997. Our primary mandate is “to assist Member States in their struggle against illicit drugs, crime, and terrorism.” To this end, we will be debating some of the core issues that plague our society, proposing resolutions to combat political corruption and to reform prison systems and prevent police corruption. According to Transparency International Corruption Perceptions Index, many developing countries have seen their perceived corruption increase in the last few years. Even developed nations have had their recent scandals of political corruption, and tackling this convoluted issue requires careful, thorough, and systematic propositions. Prison systems around the world are also in a precarious situation. These must be analyzed and any feasible resolution should take into consideration ways of preventing overcrowding and rioting, as well as preserving the human rights of those detained. As population sizes continue to grow, there is increasing pressure in these systems and, in some countries, they have already begun to burst. Through careful debate and discussion, the UNODC must take charge on proposing innovative solutions to these longstanding problems. I hope that, by participating in this committee, we will examine the intricacies of the justice systems around the world, especially considering how these two topics are becoming ever more pertinent to Latin America in recent years.

topic b: prison reform & police corruption

Prison systems around the world are also in a precarious situation. These must be analyzed and any feasible resolution should take into consideration ways of preventing overcrowding and rioting, as well as preserving the human rights of those detained. The largest nations around the world also have some of the largest per-capita prison populations. Furthermore, prison infrastructures around the world are beginning to fall apart. As population sizes continue to grow, there is increasing pressure in these systems and, in some countries, they have already begun to burst. Through careful debate and discussion, the UNODC must take charge on proposing innovative solutions to these longstanding problems. I hope that, by participating in this committee, we will examine the intricacies of the justice systems around the world, especially considering how these two topics are becoming ever more pertinent to Latin America in recent years.